Tuesday, April 21, 2015

and when they grow above me






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Cover me with soft Earth… jasmine, lilies and myrtle; and when they grow above me… they will breathe the fragrance of my Heart into space.

–Kahlil Gibran



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Monday, April 20, 2015

On youth and old age, on life and death, on breathing






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To be born and to die are common to all animals, but there are specifically diverse ways in which these phenomena occur; of destruction there are different types, though yet something is common to them all. 

There is violent death and again natural death, and the former occurs when the cause of death is external, the latter when it is internal, and involved from the beginning in the constitution of the organ, and not an affection derived from a foreign source. In the case of plants the name given to this is withering, in animals senility. 

Death and decay pertain to all things that are not imperfectly developed; to the imperfect also they may be ascribed in nearly the same but not an identical sense. Under the imperfect I class eggs and seeds of plants as they are before the root appears.

It is always to some lack of heat that death is due, and in perfect creatures the cause is its failure in the organ containing the source of the creature’s essential nature. This member is situate, as has been said, at the junction of the upper and lower parts; in plants it is intermediate between the root and the stem, in sanguineous animals it is the heart, and in those that are bloodless the corresponding part of their body. 

But some of these animals have potentially many sources of life, though in actuality they possess only one. This is why some insects live when divided, and why, even among sanguineous animals, all whose vitality is not intense live for a long time after the heart has been removed. Tortoises, for example, do so and make movements with their feet, so long as the shell is left, a fact to be explained by the natural inferiority of their constitution, as it is in insects also.

The source of life is lost to its possessors when the heat with which it is bound up is no longer tempered by cooling, for, as I have often remarked, it is consumed by itself. Hence when, owing to lapse of time, the lung in the one class and the gills in the other get dried up, these organs become hard and earthy and incapable of movement, and cannot be expanded or contracted. 
Finally things come to a climax, and the fire goes out from exhaustion.

Hence a small disturbance will speedily cause death in old age. Little heat remains, for the most of it has been breathed away in the long period of life preceding, and hence any increase of strain on the organ quickly causes extinction. 

It is just as though the heart contained a tiny feeble flame which the slightest movement puts out. Hence in old age death is painless, for no violent disturbance is required to cause death, and there is an entire absence of feeling when the soul’s connexion is severed. 

All diseases which harden the lung by forming tumours or waste residues, or by excess of morbid heat, as happens in fevers, accelerate the breathing owing to the inability of the lung to move far either upwards or downwards. 

Finally, when motion is no longer possible, the breath is given out and death ensues.


–Arostotle
G. R. T. Ross translation

more here


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Sunday, April 19, 2015

Enriching the Earth



 



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To enrich the earth I have sowed clover and grass
to grow and die. I have plowed in the seeds
of winter grains and various legumes,
their growth to be plowed in to enrich the earth.


I have stirred into the ground the offal
and the decay of the growth of past seasons
and so mended the earth and made its yield increase.


All this serves the dark. Against the shadow
of veiled possibility my workdays stand
in a most asking light. I am slowly falling
into the fund of things. 


And yet to serve the earth,
not knowing what I serve, gives a wideness
and a delight to the air, and my days
do not wholly pass. It is the mind's service,
for when the will fails so do the hands
and one lives at the expense of life.


After death, willing or not, the body serves,
entering the earth. And so what was heaviest
and most mute is at last raised up into song.



–Wendell Berry
(Collected Poems 1957 - 1982)




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Saturday, April 18, 2015

White Owl Flies Into and Out of the Field






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Coming down out of the freezing sky
with its depths of light,
like an angel, or a Buddha with wings,
it was beautiful, and accurate,
striking the snow and whatever was there
with a force that left the imprint
of the tips of its wings — five feet apart —
and the grabbing thrust of its feet,
and the indentation of what had been running
through the white valleys of the snow —
and then it rose, gracefully,
and flew back to the frozen marshes
to lurk there, like a little lighthouse,
in the blue shadows —
so I thought:

maybe death isn't darkness, after all,
but so much light wrapping itself around us —
as soft as feathers —
that we are instantly weary of looking, and looking,
and shut our eyes, not without amazement,
and let ourselves be carried,
as through the translucence of mica,
to the river that is without the least dapple or shadow,
that is nothing but light — scalding, aortal light —
in which we are washed and washed
out of our bones.


–Mary Oliver




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Friday, April 17, 2015

the cloud, excerpt






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I am the daughter of Earth and Water,
And the nursling of the Sky;

I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
I change, but I cannot die.


–Percy Bysshe Shelley



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Thursday, April 16, 2015

This World







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It appears that it was all a misunderstanding.
What was only a trial run was taken seriously.

The rivers will return to their beginnings
The wind will cease in its turning about.

Trees instead of budding will tend to their roots
Old men will chase a ball, a glance in the mirror—
They are children again.

The dead will wake up, not comprehending.
Till everything that happened has unhappened.

What a relief! 
Breathe freely, you who suffered so much.


Czesław Miłosz
New and Collected Poems (1931-2001)
translated by Robert Hass




 
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Wednesday, April 15, 2015

my soul is not asleep







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No, my soul is not asleep.
It is awake, wide awake.


It neither sleeps nor dreams, but watches,
its eyes wide open
far off things, and listens
at the shores of the great silence.



–Antonio Machado



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